Book critique 1776 by david mccullough

American revolution

In contrast to 'His Excellency', other leaders emerge in sharp relief. In "," as in "John Adams," McCullough vividly evokes the rustic ingenuity of 18th-century colonial life. What McCullough does show is that Washington had the incredibly rare gift of learning from the criticism of subordinates. More gravely, Washington didn't have a clue about strategy or tactics, and had to be rescued from his reckless plans by subordinates. Charles James Fox, a year-old fop who wore "high-heeled shoes, each of a different color," observed of the prime minister, Lord North: "Alexander the Great never gained more in one campaign than the noble lord has lost -- he has lost a whole continent. McCullough concluded the book with this summation: "Especially for those who had been with Washington and who knew what a close call it was at the beginning — how often circumstance, storms, contrary winds, the oddities or strengths of individual character had made the difference — the outcome seemed little short of a miracle. Anesthetized by textbooks, which turn the Revolution into a wonkish debate over taxes and governance? But Knox gives the answer. McCullough doesn't ask himself what would have happened if Washington had been crushed in The stories, myths and legends about each nation are passed through the generations and become part of someone's culture and identity.

Next came Washington's defence of New York. While these answers are obvious, I almost wished that the book had continued, at least to summarize the remaining years of the war. Rebels encircling Boston cloaked their advance with hay bales, and fortified their hilltop redoubt with barrels of stone and sand to roll down on the British.

McCullough concluded the book with this summation: "Especially for those who had been with Washington and who knew what a close call it was at the beginning — how often circumstance, storms, contrary winds, the oddities or strengths of individual character had made the difference — the outcome seemed little short of a miracle.

The first, and best, hundred pages center on the siege of Boston, a tense but almost bloodless affair. Hooray for lifelong learning! A British reader has to know a bit of history before starting this book.

So Washington was a slave-owner and a friend of liberty? These averaged about pages each although his book on Truman was more than 1, pages long. The minus is the lack of political background, which is perfunctory. His portrait of the Virginian who led them is much more ambivalent.

1776 musical

The Americans, showing true inventive genius, went miles to the abandoned Fort Ticonderoga, extracted its enormous guns and towed them back over snowy hills and frozen lakes.

Rated 7/10 based on 43 review
Download
Observer review: by David McCullough